Posts Tagged ‘Ryan Bubb’

Letting The Terrorists Win

October 7, 2017

In Texas, a Defiant Mood at an Outdoor Music Festival headlined a New York Times article by David Montgomery (10-6-17).  The Austin City Limits festival opened Friday (10-6-17) in Austin Texas, the first such event following the recent terrorist attack on another music festival in Las Vegas (Yes Virginia, Timothy McVeigh was a terrorist).  Analysis finds notable: “On Friday afternoon, among music lovers and families with strollers flowing into Zilker Park on the shores of the Colorado River, the mood was partly defiant and partly alert and attentive. But mostly, people were unflappable.” “Sandee Fenton, spokeswoman for the festival, said organizers expected 75,000 people in the park each day, with a total of 225,000 fans this weekend. The group offered refunds to anyone who was concerned about attending, but did not say how many were claimed.” “Just inside the entrance Friday afternoon, Joe Dickie and his wife, Beth Cottey, discussed with their son and a friend whether they should go see a performance by Willie Nelson’s son, or a rock band called Royal Blood. The family, who hails from Austin, has come to nearly every Austin City Limits event since its inception in 2002. Mr. Dickie, a technical consultant, said that the four had debated this year whether to attend. “So now that one crazy person has done that, it might inspire somebody else,” he said, referring to the tragedy in Las Vegas. But in the end, he said, the decision was easy. “We feel very secure,” he said. “We’re not going to let it ruin our good time.”” Montgomery quotes Tyler Costolo, 25, who flew in from Boca Raton Florida: ““I’m kind of the opinion things like that shouldn’t change your life,” said Mr. Costolo, wearing a white T-shirt with the name of the band The Front Bottoms. “At that point, you’re letting those kinds of things win.”” None of this would be at all unusual to residents of Israel, France, United Kingdom, Spain, etc. After terrorist attacks that have occurred there one continuously hears (and re hears) the refrain that by showing up, going on with the everyday activities disrupted by the terrorists, one keeps the terrorists from winning. In Newark Ohio there is a different response to the ominous terrorist threat. Newark’s only downtown park, the Newark version of Central Park, surrounds the historic (and recently restored) county courthouse. Previously benches and picnic tables provided relaxing spots for get togethers amid majestic trees on a neatly tended grass lawn. There was even a spacious gazebo for larger organized gatherings. Now we read: “The picnic tables, where downtown employees often ate their lunches or people played cards in the evening, will not return, the mayor [Jeff Hall] said. Security concerns, Hall said, played into the decision to avoid having people sitting at tables, with backpacks, near the government building. Instead, there are more benches, which are further away from the building. The gazebo will be stored for the winter and appear next year on the lawn of the former Children’s Home site, at 771 E. Main St. Private donations will be used to move and store the gazebo.” (Gazebo to move from courthouse grounds to former children’s home site Kent Mallett, The Advocate, 9-26-17). Analysis concludes with that marvelous premonitory quote regarding Newark’s central park by Ryan Bubb in yesterday’s Advocate: “”It’s going to be back better than it was,” he said.” (Newark Council: Gazebo should stay, but will it? Editor Benjamin Lanka,10-6-17)

 

Polarization And Gerrymandering

October 6, 2017

Analysis finds there to be endless speculation, with statistical backing, on “the polarization of America” on the majority of issues facing our children’s future. Whether this is a readily available handle on the news by the news media, or “fake news” promoted by tech savvy raconteurs (both foreign and domestic), or is actually so but impossible to grasp unless you are a main frame computer is a contemporary puzzle. The US Supreme Court is currently hearing a case questioning Wisconsin’s political redistricting. Labeled gerrymandering, the issue is rather one of domination than polarization. Locally, in Newark Ohio, we have the destruction of the courthouse square gazebo which ostensibly is part of the City of Newark’s public domain but sits adjacent the Licking County Courthouse (also a public domain but of the county, not city). Confused? It is all akin to the township trustee positions that some municipal voters get to vote on even though unaffected by any township adjudication. Where is the gerrymandering and polarization in all this when it comes to the Newark City Council, Mayor Jeff Hall, and the voting residents of Newark? A recent editorial, er, report by the Advocate editor, Benjamin Lanka, may shed some light on this (since obviously no one would admit to polarization in Newark let alone gerrymandering with the ward districting supplemented by at large representatives). Entitled “Newark Council: Gazebo should stay, but will it?” (10-6-17) it paints a rather ambiguous picture (THAT is an understatement!). In a nut shell, Lanka goes out of his way to survey each council representative and their views on the matter. All, save one, would prefer the gazebo remain and not be destroyed. All plead powerlessness to stopping Mayor Hall’s action (but for discretely polarized reasons!). The “save one” is none other than Licking County Commissioner Tim Bubb’s son, Ryan Bubb. In the past, Ryan would have been given the benefit of doubt with regard to nepotism, but with the age of the Kushners being part and parcel of the White House administration, the doubt itself is more than doubtful. Commenters to Lanka’s editorial, er, reporting raised the obvious. When Lanka writes “The costs of moving and restoring the gazebo are being paid by private donors.” They ask “who are the private donors?” Analysis speculates it is probably a public private partnership (like JobsOhio) which is not obligated to disclose their “private” parts (so fashionable these days!). Investigative reporting is not this particular Advocate reporter’s forte. Lanka concludes his editorial, er, article by quoting Ryan Bubb: “”It’s going to be back better than it was,” he said.” Priceless! Analysis finds the gerrymandering and polarization of Newark to be a little more readily apparent when one asks a simple question – why has no one suggested (publicly voiced) recalling the mayor if he continues with his administrative action counter the people’s will? All of a sudden the polarization jumps out. The ambiguity of the GOP representative’s we’d-like-it-to-stay-but (“Would I like to see it stay? Absolutely,” Frazier said. “That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t respect the authority of the mayor.”) is obviously inevitable (an acknowledgement of the little man behind the curtain in Oz). It is what comes after the “but” that makes for the affirmative statement (we still abide by the GOP power structure). The reticence of the Democratic candidates to generate any action to save the gazebo (initiate a recall) points to the de facto gerrymandering (their very powerlessness). Their positions within their districts are none too secure. Analysis finds (on the national level) talk, reporting and commentary on gerrymandering and polarization to be often times, if not most of the time, couched in terms of economics. However, as the Newark gazebo shows, polarization and gerrymandering are about those who have power, and those who are lorded over. We will have our way because we can. And in this case, we can make the gazebo disappear. “It’s going to be back better than it was.” Now THAT’S power!