Posts Tagged ‘Ohio HJR 19’

Polarity And The Burning Of The Reichstag

December 9, 2018

In the previous posting Analysis looked at the lame duck fever in Ohio, the symptoms of which did not appear until after the midterm election. Ohio is not alone though it differs somewhat from its “rust belt” neighbors, Michigan and Wisconsin. In Ohio, the GOP dominance of the three branches of gov’t continues with the new administrations whereas in Wisconsin and Michigan, there will be newly elected opposition administration to the previous GOP hegemony. In a flurry of last minute activity to cash in on their current trifecta of power, those state legislatures, in co-ordination with the governor, have passed legislation limiting and altering the powers of upcoming executive administration as well as voting rights. Though a last grasping of power for the GOP, it is likewise apparently quite legal for the legislature to act thusly. Meanwhile, in another state with similar GOP dominance, the possibility of a non-GOP win in the midterms could not be left to the chance of democracy. Caught with their pants down, one North Carolina congressional race was not certified due to election “irregularities” so blatant that a fraud investigation ensued. “The head of North Carolina’s Republican Party says he would “not oppose” a new election in the state’s 9th Congressional District if allegations of fraud by a GOP operative prove true. “If they can say with a strong degree of certainty that the outcome of the race was changed or there is a substantial likelihood that it could have been, the law requires that there be a new election, and we would not oppose,” said Dallas Woodhouse, the executive director of the North Carolina Republican Party, in an interview with NPR.” (N.C. GOP Leader Open To New Election As Fraud Investigation Continues, Miles Parks, NPR, 12-6-18) A magnanimous gesture? Earlier the same director was quoted as saying “”This is funny business on the part of Democrats, in part to try and steal this race,” Woodhouse told NPR on Monday.” Analysis would like to consider this “funny business” in light of the recent revelations regarding the Bundy’s of “Do Not Tread On Me” fame. Reported variously, Newsweek gives Militia Leader Ammon Bundy Quits ‘Patriot Movement’ After Criticizing Trump’s Rhetoric On Immigrants, Jenni Finks, 12-7-18. Back in the latter part of November Ammon posted disagreement with the GOP policy regarding migrants, the caravan, their treatment as well as perception. His father, also of Don’t Tread On Me Fame, essentially said ditto in support of his son (and received the same response). “On Tuesday, Bundy shut down his social media accounts and said he was stepping out of the public spotlight. After seeing the militia movement’s opposition to the migrant caravan and blind support for Trump, Bundy also decided to leave the “patriot movement” he was once seen as spearheading.” “”It’s like being in a room full of people in here, trying to teach, and no one is listening,” Bundy told BuzzFeed News. “The vast majority seemed to hang on to what seemed like hate, and fear, and almost warmongering, and I don’t want to associate myself with warmongers.” Analysis utilizes Wiki to go way back in the way back machine. “Reichstagsbrand was an arson attack on the Reichstag building (home of the German parliament) in Berlin on 27 February 1933, one month after Adolf Hitler was sworn in as Chancellor of Germany. Hitler’s government stated that Marinus van der Lubbe, a Dutch council communist, was found near the building and attributed the fire to communist agitators in general—though in 1933, a German court decided that van der Lubbe had acted alone, as he claimed. After the fire, the Reichstag Fire Decree was passed. The Nazi Party used the fire as evidence that communists were plotting against the German government, and the event is considered pivotal in the establishment of Nazi Germany. The term Reichstag fire has come to refer to false flag actions perpetrated or facilitated by an authority to promote their own interests through popular approval of retribution or retraction of civil rights.” Analysis finds that the voting fraud perpetrated by the GOP operatives in North Carolina could eventually (when the news cycle has passed) become more than adequate justification for even greater voter suppression legislation enacted by GOP dominant state governments. This would be in keeping with what is currently occurring in other states dominated by the GOP (including Ohio). When the opposition (Democrats, etc.) are considered as “the enemy” determined to “try and steal” any election, then is it any wonder that the country is polarized? It becomes no mystery that the GOP legislatures, whether lame duck or recently elected, would pass election law meant to suppress the vote rather than encourage and enable it. Using Ammon Bundy’s words to describe the GOP instead of the Patriot Movement, it appears that “The vast majority seemed to hang on to what seemed like hate, and fear, and almost warmongering.”

Will The Real Governing Body Of People Please Stand Up

November 29, 2018

Stand your ground, heartbeat bill, pastor protection, embryonic personhood, every new born shall possess a gun, if they cannot afford it, one will be provided for them…Just some of the endless priorities for legislation once electioneering days have passed. In the Ohio state house currently is House Bill 625 which “prevent[s] cities from passing taxes or bans on plastic bags and other disposable containers.” (Ohio House votes to block local bans, fees on plastic bags by Jeremy Pelzer, cleveland.com, 11-28-18) “Several business groups have supported the bill, including the Ohio Council of Retail Merchants, the Ohio Grocers Association, and the Ohio Manufacturers’ Association.” “The bill’s other co-sponsor, state Rep. George Lang of Butler County, echoed that [State Rep Scott Lipps’] sentiment. “The market can regulate itself – it doesn’t need the government to get involved in every aspect of what they do,” he said.” Licking County recently experienced ditto above with Kent Mallet reporting: Public opposition derails proposal for Licking County contractor registration (The Advocate 11-27-18). “The proposal, the result of a contractor registration review committee meeting monthly since March, would have required contractors to register with the Licking County Building Code Department prior to starting work. The registration would have been required for general, HVAC, fire protection, electrical, refrigeration and hydronics contractors. The fee was set at $100 annually for each contractor, with a $300 fine for failure to comply.” “The resolution, however, was on the commissioners’ Tuesday agenda with 24 others. The commissioners usually vote to approve all the day’s resolutions in one vote, but occasionally remove a resolution before approving the rest. McKean Township Trustee Dannette McInturff said, “They completely ignored the governing body of the people they’re trying to regulate. It is a shame the way it had to be brought to light. If not, it would have passed today. It is on the agenda for today.” For anyone confused the ”contract registration review committee” is comprised of the usual suspects, area business people, which likewise comprise McInturff’s “ignored governing body of the people.” Likewise this was never broached during the midterm’s contested commissioner race. “And, some said the issue should have been debated before the recent re-election of Commissioner Rick Black. Hanover Township Trustee Heath Smith told Black, “You get re-elected and two weeks later you’re trying to push this under the table. I think that’s kind of shoddy there.”” What if the “governing body of the people” takes the lead? Turns out there’s an app for that too. Ohio lawmakers seek to make it harder for voters to change state constitution (Jeremy Pelzer, cleveland.com, 11-28-18). “House Joint Resolution 19 comes after Ohio legislative leaders lamented what they said was a “cottage industry” set up to put frivolous amendments on the statewide ballot. Under the resolution, 60 percent of Ohio voters would have to approve a proposed constitutional amendment for it to pass. Currently, any proposed constitutional amendment — including HJR 19 itself — needs a simple majority of “yes” votes to take effect. It would also move up the deadline to submit the hundreds of thousands of petition signatures needed to put a proposed amendment on the ballot. That deadline is now in early July; the resolution would move it to April 1. In addition, each petition signature would only be valid for 180 days. Right now, there’s no expiration date for signatures. HJR 19 would also change the way Ohioans can force the state legislature to pass a law. Right now, a group can force lawmakers to take action on a proposal if it gathers a number of petition signatures equal to 3 percent of the number of voters in the last gubernatorial election (that number is 129,553, based on this year’s gubernatorial vote). If lawmakers don’t pass the measure within four months, proponents can gather signatures from another 3 percent of voters to put the proposal on the statewide ballot. Under the resolution, the initial signature requirement would be raised to 5 percent of the last gubernatorial vote. But if lawmakers don’t pass the measure within four months, it would go directly to the statewide ballot without needing any additional signatures. In addition, any law passed in this way couldn’t be altered or repealed by lawmakers for one year after its passage, under the resolution.” Paper or plastic? Another instance of something completely not on the horizon pre midterm election but now in play would be: Cleveland aims to provide free legal representation for tenants in eviction cases (Leila Atassi, cleveland.com, 11-28-18). It would be modeled after an NYC program that provides attorneys for those who face eviction. The current ratio of attorneys in eviction cases representing landlords/tenants is 90% of landlords and less that 10% of tenants. ““If someone is facing a life-altering proceeding, there is no justice if one side has an attorney and the other side does not,” [Right-To-Counsel Mark] Levine said. “… We should all be outraged by that. The landlords have built a business model that uses housing court as a weapon, knowing that it’s not going to be a fair fight.” In 2017, however, after three years of demonstrations, news conferences and petitions to Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York passed legislation providing legal representation in eviction cases to all defendants whose income is 200 percent of the federal poverty level or below. Since then, the city has seen a 24 percent reduction in evictions, with fewer cases filed overall. And 84 percent of tenants with representation are staying in their homes, Levine said.” Cleveland is considering this as the cost of the program is more than offset by the savings to “the cost of sheltering families, providing social services, and educating transient youth.” Paper or plastic? Home rule for cities with initiatives like this are once again vulnerable to being shot down by a state legislature with an enormous track record of doing just that, for “the governing body of the people”. “State Rep. Stephanie Howse, a Cleveland Democrat, said businesses also have a responsibility to work to better the communities they’re located in. She also suggested that House Republicans were hypocritical when it comes to how much power local governments should have. “It’s amazing how this body selectively makes decisions on when we want to have local control versus when we don’t,” she said.” (Pelzer, Ohio House votes to block…) In Ohio, who is “the governing body of people”?