Posts Tagged ‘Jay Hottinger’

Home Rule

October 3, 2019

It has been about a year since Analysis wrote about Cleveland’s attempt to craft legislation creating a program of public defenders for those being evicted (Will The Real Governing Body Of People Please Stand Up 11-29-18). This legislation was to be modeled on a hard fought, and somewhat imperfect, similar one in New York City. Analysis questioned whether the GOP legislature of the State of Ohio would allow such city rule to be implemented. They have, and had, neutralized home rule through gun control legislation and, with Cleveland, outlawing their percentage of Cleveland resident workers/contractors on city funded projects legislation. 10-1-19 Robert Higgs for cleveland.com reports: Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson signs into law program to provide lawyers for impoverished families facing eviction. With Cleveland’s creative solution to stem the growing problem of people without housing (nothing comes from nothing. One is displaced from some “place”) Analysis finds notable: “Cleveland City Council approved legislation to create the program Monday evening. The program is an effort to ease the upheaval that families face from eviction by giving them the ability to negotiate a better outcome through an advocate who knows the law. City Council President Kevin Kelley has said he hopes the program can be up and running by June 2020. United Way of Greater Cleveland is expected to manage the program, coordinating training for lawyers and getting them assigned to cases. Housing Court Judge Ronald O’Leary said Monday he expects a lot of eviction cases will be referred to mediation for settlement.” “Roughly 10,000 eviction cases are filed each a year in Cleveland, according to the Legal Aid Society, which provides lawyers for some clients with incomes at or below 200% of the federal poverty rate. Landlords have a tremendous advantage when the cases come to Cleveland Housing Court because only 1% to 2% of tenants have legal representation, Legal Aid’s research shows. About 75% of landlords appear with lawyers for eviction proceedings.” How many eviction cases are filed in Newark each year? With a census figure of approximately 48% of Newark residential housing being non-owner occupant, Analysis would surmise quite a few. Is such a creative solution to a justice disparity on the horizon of any of the candidates running for political office in Newark in 2019? The “legacy” minded incumbent for mayor is mum, hoping his “Outside the city” solution is not memorialized. The “cheerleading” challenger finds little enthusiasm amongst voters for tackling the inequity of eviction (private property rights and all). And those vying for the various city council positions? They’ve all committed to a vow of silence. The good news is that so far the legislators in the Ohio House and Senate haven’t quashed Cleveland’s creative attempt to stymie the national housing crisis. Let them know. Contact Republicans Scott Ryan and Jay Hottinger and thank them for allowing cities to exercise home rule with regards to the problem of those without housing.

Ask Any Republican

January 13, 2018

Ask any Republican, and the chances are good, that the Republican won’t recall or repeat what was said. Go ahead. Ask ‘em. Josh Mandel has left the leadership stage of the Ohio GOP. No asking him. “Not a career politician” GOP U.S. Representative Jim Renacci has stepped in to fill the void in contention for the upcoming Senate seat (“When President @realDonaldTrump asks you to run — you do it. That’s why I am proud to announce that I am running for the United States Senate! I’m ready to fight for the Trump agenda and get things done in the Senate!#MAGA”). Well, Mr. Not-A-Career-Politician? “I’ve said all along the president many times says what people are thinking. I learned as a business guy that you have to be careful what you say because people pick everything up. Believe me, I’ve learned that when you’ve got a mike on, you’ve got to watch what you say.” “I know it’s difficult for the president because many times you want to say what you are thinking but in the end, I know a lot of times he is saying what people are thinking,” And he’s “a business guy going into a political career.” What could be more Republican? And as we all know from our Conservative hymnals, business guys are our salvation. What about a more contemplative, prayerful Conservative? Like Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (GOP U.S. Rep from Wis.): “The first thing that came to my mind was very unfortunate, unhelpful, but you know what I thought of right away? I thought about my own family.” Atta (good Conservative altar) boy, Paul! And the Newark Advocate’s tireless investigative reporters got these responses from our own GOP Licking County Commissioner Tim Bubb: “ .” GOP Newark Mayor Jeff Hall: “ .” GOP Licking County Prosecutor Bill Hayes: “ .” GOP State Senator Jay Hottinger: ” .” And (not a politician) business guy Steve Layman: “ .” Analysis finds it reassuring to learn “what people are thinking.”  Ask any Republican, and the chances are good, that the Republican won’t recall or repeat what was said. Go ahead. Ask ‘em.

What We Have Learned

September 22, 2017

The sports news usually runs a headline like “What we have learned after week two of the NFL (or NBA, etc.).” Analysis finds news of the last few weeks to be fast and furious, and all over the map. Indeed, much news focuses on one “event” while ongoing events simply are elided. So what have we learned in the last couple of weeks of news? One thing for sure is that Americans have learned that news coverage is a professional activity. No, not the high esteem for journalistic excellence that used to sell print productions, but at least that hurricanes and what they leave behind are not “fake news.” This implies that those reporting it are not a fake news service. All of which enabled not only Rand Paul but the AP to run a headline story like “Trump hits GOP foes of health bill, Sen. Paul calls it fake” (9-22-17). We have learned that Newark’s Jay Hottinger will speak at a FED UP! rally while sponsoring stand your ground legislation and House Representative Pat Tiberi will speak at the same rally while legislating to get rid of Medicaid (where’s the fake in all this?).  We have learned that even though (factually) over 40% of residential housing in Newark is non-owner occupant, the city council of Newark would prefer that those persons owning “real” property do the governing, whether they reside in Newark or are even flesh and blood people with a birthday (Special tax coming for downtown Newark after Newark City Council approval, The Advocate, Maria DeVito, 9-21-17). We’ve learned that local, state or national, we prefer our administrators to be wealthy.  We’ve learned that if the administration’s cabinet is made up of billionaire’s appointed on the sole qualification of being determined to undermine that office, well, it actually happens (be it with Devos, Sessions, Price, Perry, etc.). A curious thing we’ve been learning but continue to deny is the importance of branding. Anything of Obama origin is quickly dismissed, replaced by the self-same policy or directive only now with the apprentice president’s specific logo on it (like the apprentice president’s Houston visit ball caps). DACA, Korea, Syria, health care all roll on with the self same administration, only a different brand name. We’ve learned categorically that this is because there is no “plan”. There is no plan for DACA (limbo was never imagined as a “plan”), there is no plan for the Syrian imbroglio (still the same US involvement as before the change of administration), no plan to confront, contain or reduce rising healthcare costs (let alone create greater inclusion), no plan to deal with the Korean peninsula (unless one defines playground name calling as a strategy). And now, on a near nightly basis we are learning about pop culture’s definitive version of the Viet Nam War (The Vietnam War: A film by Ken Burns & Lynn Novick – PBS). What we haven’t learned, yet, is that there is no definitive version of history – something the recent brouhaha over confederate monuments reinforces (that they were manufactured and installed for historically different reasons at historically different times). Much of what is now revelatory in Novick’s and Burns’s flick, was contemporary news at the time it happened. Then it wasn’t labeled “fake”, but rather dismissed as irrelevant or outright denied. What we have learned is that current climate change denial, racism in America denial, income gap disparity denial, health care denial, all parallel the historic denials of the Ike through tricky Dick era that the Burns Novick film covers. After all, isn’t that what we have learned?

Roughage

December 13, 2016

Various news outlets (CBS, NBC, Etc.) have been reporting on the total net worth of president elect Trump’s cabinet picks. Currently the combined total stands at over $14 billion. Remember Jay Hottinger’s Op Ed column in The Advocate educating his constituents on how really big a billion is? Well, Donnie’s cabinet net worth is 30 times that of W’s. And if Rex Tillerson becomes secretary of state, well, like the current stock market, it will be at a record high and climbing. Analysis finds it curious that the prime motivator of our businessman president is making money, something he reminded everyone time and again during the two year campaign (and continues to remind). Analysis feels it could be safely assumed as ditto for his cronies. All well and good, the US has a president who insists on only the best that money can buy. Analysis finds incongruity with OSU’s Urban Meyer receiving a greater salary than the future 45th president of the US of A, as well as any of his cabinet picks. So it obviously can’t be monetary gain that is motivating this crew of international business heavy hitters. What could it be? Trans national corporations (global businesses) have no territorial allegiance (Ireland, Switzerland or the Cayman Islands, it is all one and the same to these corporate “persons”). So patriotism it is not. Whatever it may be is for the pundits to ponder (fodder to bloviate). Analysis is more interested in what happens when “the going gets rough.” Will the 21st century Washington version of Hollywood’s rat pack “get going”? Historic precedent may be of value here. After the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil disaster, another international corporation heavy hitter, BP CEO Tony Hayward, declared “You know, I’d like my life back.” He traded in his BP CEO hard hat for a lesser position as head of Russian operations. Roughage usually contributes to movement.

Why Does A City Even Bother To Make Laws?

December 7, 2016

In the 11-20-16 post (It’s Troubling That People Face Different Charges For The Same Offense) Analysis posed the rhetorical question “Why does a city make laws to begin with?” Today, Maria DeVito reports that a handful of Newark residents asked the same question, only non rhetorically. “Despite the cold and rain Tuesday morning, about a dozen protesters chanted outside the Newark Municipal Building to voice their frustration that the city will ignore the newly passed marijuana decriminalization law. Shawn Aber, a Newark resident, organized the People Have Spoken rally after learning the city will charge people under the state laws for marijuana.” “”If the people voted it in, one man should not be able to change it,” Aber said.” (Group protests Newark decision to ignore pot law, Advocate, 12-6-16). It appears the question is not so rhetorical after all, and maybe Mr. Aber is on to something that he himself is totally unaware of. Same day, the Advocate’s parent company, Gannett, reporter in Cincinnati headlines “Lawmakers want to block $15 minimum wage (Jessie Balmert 12-6-16). “Legislators want to block efforts like one from Cincinnatians for a Strong Economy to raise the city’s minimum wage to $15-an-hour. Ohio’s GOP-controlled legislature would prohibit cities from imposing a minimum wage that is higher than the state’s rate, which will be $8.15 next year.” “State lawmakers plan to add the prohibition to another bill: One that would prevent cities from imposing their own rules on where pet stores can purchase animals. That proposed legislation, called the Petland Bill, is a reaction to a Grove City ordinance that prevented pet stores from purchasing animals from puppy mills.” Dear reader, please recall the fracking brouhaha that resulted in the state overriding individual municipalities from enacting drilling restrictions within their communities. In the previous We’re Dealin’ post (11-27-16) Analysis found itself questioning “Which “public” will our political leaders be fighting for?” It was pointed out that the various government entities all claim to be looking out for the best interest of “the public”. Even Licking County Commissioner Tim Bubb feels the sting of who gets to represent “the public” when he told LCJFS Director John Fisher “We’re looking at some loss of revenue next year courtesy of the state.” (see previous post Cleansing 12-5-16). Analysis detects a thread here that was anticipated years ago at the start of this blog but has been difficult to corroborate. Over the past decades there has been a concerted effort made to redefine how America is governed through the lobbying of ALEC (if the reader is not familiar with ALEC, Wiki American Legislative Exchange Council, then Google same). Anecdotal evidence always appeared in the form of various disparate states passing similar legislation, all modeled on wording drawn up by ALEC. Americans For Prosperity likewise found that pursuing an agenda of changing state legislature to fulfill their demands of free market and smaller government was more effective than doing it through the federal government (Some would say the outcome of the recent election confirms the effectiveness of that back door strategy). Analysis points at the plethora of ultimate state determination of everything from education (pre-K through grad school), economic development, employment, etc. to health, marijuana, minimum wage, children’s services and puppy sourcing. This is done not only through economic incentives/prohibitions (taxes, cuts in funding) but also in the legislative creation and enactment of law. Why does a city even bother to make laws?