Posts Tagged ‘Intel’

Anticipation

June 12, 2022

            Intel is ever present with any edition of the Newark Advocate. There seems to be an entire industry devoted to the anticipation of an event being more important than the event itself (which may account for the eventual lack of actual planning since the anticipation of the event displaces the event itself. We rather prefer to plan for the anticipation). This characteristic of the American culture is to account for OSU football (and back to school) occurring in July, Halloween in September and Christmas at Halloween!  What was missing in the local news this past week was of a Newark March For Our Lives event. Although Newark took part in the original, this past week’s non existent event may be attributed to lack of institution, or interest. Unlike interest, which can wax and wane, institution covers the irregularities and gaps to provide a structure for the repetition of events like March For Our Lives. But then again, who funds our institutions has proven to be determinate of what the interest is. Nationally, in the news this past week, there was the initial presentation of the January 6 commission. Conservative critics, like David Brooks, say the effort is wasted – too much focus on the past, not enough addressed to rectifying the divisiveness of the present through future solutions. Analysis indicates the findings of this congressional commission to be akin to a lifeline. Without it there is absolutely no possibility of bridging the divide. Its findings provide a slender thread of closure. Would you prefer a lifeline of truth and facts, or one composed of lies? The same “emphasis of the future” was the criticism of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation commission’s activities. Focused on the past, it did provide a tangible basis for going forward. Analogous to this is our present Jan 6 commission in Washington. Sure, it would be great if the entrepreneurs of the insurgency were jailed. Without being cynical, but rather realistic, no one was ever jailed for the 2008 financial meltdown. Also no truth and justice commission investigated it. Maybe if there had been such an actual, in depth, day by day analysis, it wouldn’t be so difficult to locate the source of today’s out of hand economic inflation. Dealing with the uncomfortable at hand tends to lessen the recurrence in the future. But then again, American culture is all about anticipation, and the future.

The Sound Of Silence

June 1, 2022

“The Gap report released jointly by the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio and the National Low Income Housing Coalition shows a deficit of 254,545 rental units that are affordable and available to the state’s 443,717 extremely low income households. That equates to only 43 affordable units for every 100 households.” The report was issued 4-21-22. It followed data available through 2020 and does not include pandemic related housing stress. As pointed out by the report, rents jumped by an average 11% in major Ohio cities in 2021 (now, well into 2022, probably higher overall). “COHHIO Executive Director Bill Faith called on state leaders to invest $308 million of the $5.6 billion in State Fiscal Recovery Funds that Ohio received from the American Rescue Plan Act to address the affordable housing shortage.” Remember Steve Stivers, former US Congressman from a gerrymandered district that snaked from the margins of Upper Arlington to the depths of south central Ohio? Of course you do. Who could forget his opting out of representing his constituents for a job with the Ohio Chamber, and the Trump intervened special election that followed? ““Employees need a safe, decent, affordable home to raise healthy families and be productive at work,” Ohio Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Steve Stivers said. “This one-time investment of Ohio’s Fiscal Recovery Funds on affordable housing will create jobs in the near-term, and will strengthen our workforce for the long-term.”” Duh? But Steve’s not alone in his public aspiration. “More than 200 companies and organizations are supporting COHHIO’s affordable housing plan, including the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, Ohio REALTORS, the Ohio Bankers’ League, CareSource, Huntington Bank, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, PNC, and the Ohio Apartment Association.” It would be curious to learn if Park National Bank could be included. After all, Licking County’s Commissioners have a bit of an identity problem round about now. With Intel and all the big bucks development in the western portion, are we an urban center or an “Aw shucks” rural enclave encroached by modernity? No matter, “Erica Mulryan, Director of the Ohio Balance of State Continuum of Care, which oversees the homeless system in Ohio’s 80 non-urban counties, said rising rents and the lack of affordable housing are making it more difficult to get people out of shelter and into permanent homes. “Our agencies’ rehousing programs depend on private landlords to help get people out of homelessness. But it’s getting harder and harder to find landlords who are willing to partner with us,” Mulryan said. “Ohio’s rural and suburban counties desperately need more affordable housing.”” Get people out of shelter? What shelter? The leaders of Newark and Licking County have opted to not-be-able-to-afford-it. Meanwhile, in the county with a rural/urban identity problem, Kent Mallet gave this Economic Statistic in his Newark Advocate Answer Man column roughly a month after the Gap report: “The total volume of sold homes in Licking County through four months was $220,078,195. That’s a 21% increase from last year and a 51% increase from two years ago.” As pointed out in the previous blog posting, the county has increased its revenue stream in the last 2 years. This, in combination with the State Fiscal Recovery Funds included as part of ARP, makes the “can’t afford it” excuse rather disingenuous. Hear that silence? It’s not the duo of Simon and Garfunkel, rather the trio of Bubb, Black and Flowers, Licking County’s Commissioners.