Silent Ischemia

The 5-31-19 online Newark Advocate announced “A Newark city councilman plans to propose an amendment to existing legislation to use new Ohio gas tax funding to target paving for neighborhood streets.” (Newark councilman to propose funds from Ohio gas tax target neighborhood streets, Michaela Sumner) Sumner’s quotes: “I believe that our residents have for years, been talking about wanting to get their roads paved,” [Jeremy] Blake said. “It’s those neighborhood streets that may not have been touched for decades. They’ve been paying their taxes and doing their due diligence and I think it’s time we get onto a regular maintenance schedule of paving these neighborhood roads.” Analysis finds “neighborhood streets that may not have been touched for decades” politely says that the city’s residents of those neighborhoods also pretty much don’t expect anything different. How so? In one section of his recent book, “Dying Of Whiteness”, Dr. Jonathan M. Metzl went to Kansas to consider the impact of GOP fiscal austerity on it’s previously historically great K-12 schools. On pg. 232 Metzl writes: “Pulling money out was not fixed simply by putting money back in. Rather, cutting money from schools cut off perfusion and oxygen as if by heart disease, leading to silent ischemia. Part of the reason why this was the case was because reducing funding and eliminating programs did more than simply reduce school capacities. Budget cuts also narrowed people’s expectations for what was possible from school in the first place and of what it cost to get there. As one superintendent put it to me: “It’s really hard to see the changes unless you’ve been a superintendent that whole time, because I don’t even think principals who change schools really fully grasp what’s going on. And it’s rare to have a board member that’s been on for ten or twelve years, and it’s even more rare to have a board member that’s been on that time that’s so engaged. It’s not anybody saying, “I don’t want this for my kids,” but they just don’t know what we had or what might be possible from great schools.”” It is likewise for the city of Newark. On average, Americans relocate their residence at or around 5 years. Homeowners average 13 years in a residence. With 48% of Newark residences being non-owner occupant, just about half of Newark’s current residents can’t recall what the neighborhood was like when Jeff Hall first took the oath of office as mayor for all of Newark’s neighborhoods (not just the downtown business association). “Budget cuts also narrowed people’s expectations for what was possible” not only with regard to the condition of the streets they lived on, but also any public transportation (which once was part of Newark), city wide public health services, sufficient emergency service personnel, residential building standards (rentals), neighborhood community services and programs such as art and recreation, etc. Non-owner occupant tenants feel little connection to Newark. Most simply assume that, like the building they reside in, the streets are maintained by “someone else”. Does that make the mayor the Landlord of Newark? With the loss of any genuine history with heart (Children’s Home, Gazebo, etc.) in favor of a fabricated history of profit (Downtown Newark manufactured to be Easton Lite), Newark’s current residents “just don’t know what we had or what might be possible from [a] great” city. Vying to be mayor, Analysis forecasts both Jeff Hall AND Jeremy Blake will repeatedly stress “what a great city Newark is” in their pitch to the Newark electorate.

Ischemia – “an inadequate blood supply to an organ or part of the body, especially the heart muscles.”

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