Discerning Ohio Issue 2

The conventional wisdom coming from those covering Ohio and local news regarding Issue 2 is that “Folks just don’t know enough.” What is Issue 2, you say? See, you just don’t know enough. Analysis shows the pundits to be right. Knowledge wanting, the advertising blitz is on to buy your vote. The pro Issue 2 folks offer a small partial solution to the ever rising cost of healthcare. They are backed by the nurses’ union. Even Bernie Sanders’ image and voice from past speeches are featured in their ads. But wait! The anti Issue 2 folks have long time Democratic consultant and Innovation Ohio fixture Dale Butland doing the talk shows as a paid spokesman (the group’s communications director). Just another gig for brother Dale, you say? Their ads claim the backing of various Veterans groups as well as members of the medical industrial complex. Currently they are outspending the pro folks by 3:1. “Ohioans Against the Deceptive Rx Ballot Issue spent $9.7 million of the $15.8 million it has raised from May 30 to June 21, according to campaign finance reports filed Monday with the Ohio secretary of state. Ohio Taxpayers for Lower Drug Prices raised $3.7 million from January through June 30 and has spent nearly all of it, according to its report.” (Issue 2 opponents spent $9.7 million against Ohio drug price measure, Laura Hancock for Cleveland.com, 7-31-17). Know more now than you did before? Of course not. In archive posts Analysis has indicated that part of the debacle of the climate change “debate” centers on “cause and effect” science versus “correlation” science. Cause and effect seeks absolute irrefutable proof, correlation employs artificial intelligence utilizing extensive data to reveal trends and likelihoods of great certainty. Case in point would be the recent Ohio State Fair ride tragedy. Non Destructive Tests (NDT) would have indicated a high probability of metal weakness and probable failure. But this is a correlation, not cause and effect. Cutting the metal parts (destruction) would definitively reveal their actual condition (absolute, irrefutable proof). When it comes to the future, cause and effect science is full proof, and would be nice. But it might be more practical and useful to employ correlation in many instances. Case in point would be the addition of a recent Washington Post article to that of Laura Hancock’s. “Study: Doctors received more than $46 million from drug companies marketing opioids” by Katie Zezima, 8-9-17 offers the following: “One in 12 doctors has received money from drug companies marketing prescription opioid medications, according to a study released Wednesday afternoon. Researchers at Boston Medical Center found that from 2013 to 2015, 68,177 doctors received more than $46 million in payments from drug companies pushing powerful painkillers. Researchers believe it is the first study to look at the practice of pharmaceutical companies marketing opioids to physicians.” “Doctors were paid the most for the promotion of fentanyl, which is typically used in hospitals to treat post-surgical pain, cancer patients and for end-of-life care. Most of the fentanyl driving the increase in deaths is illicitly manufactured overseas and cut into heroin. According to the study, companies were not aggressively marketing tamper-proof versions of pills, which were created in response to the opioid crisis.” “According to [author Scott] Hadland’s study, which was published in the American Journal of Public Health, about two-thirds of the payments came from speaking fees. About 700 doctors raked in nearly 83 percent of the total money spent marketing to physicians. Pharmaceutical companies spent freely around the country, but some of the states hit hardest by the opioid crisis, including Indiana, Ohio and New Jersey, recorded the most payments to doctors.” Add to that the multiple lawsuits, settled or pending, in West Virginia, Ohio, Mississippi, Oklahoma, etc. involving pharmaceutical manufacturers and distributors, and Issue 2 begins to look a little different. Cause and effect certainty?  Without knowing anything for certain, are you beginning to discern something about Ohio Issue 2?

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One Response to “Discerning Ohio Issue 2”

  1. Writer Says:

    Near me, the city of Everett, Wa is suing a drug company for over-providing it and helping to create an opioid epidemic there. I look forward to seeing what happens next.

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